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Congressional Medal of Honor
Heroes of the Battle off Savo Island


World War II History Medal of Honor Separator


Congressional Medal of Honor
Awarded Posthumously

DANIEL JUDSON CALLAGHAN

Rank and organization: Rear Admiral, U.S. Navy.
Place and date: During action against enemy Japanese forces off Savo Island on the night of 12-13 November 1942.
Born: 26 July 1892, San Francisco, California.
Appointed from: California.
Entered service at: Oakland, California.
Other Navy award: Distinguished Service Medal.

Although out-balanced in strength and numbers by a desperate and determined enemy, Rear Adm. Callaghan, with ingenious tactical skill and superb coordination of the units under his command, led his forces into battle against tremendous odds, thereby contributing decisively to the rout of a powerful invasion fleet, and to the consequent frustration of a formidable Japanese offensive. While faithfully directing close-range operations in the face of furious bombardment by superior enemy fire power, he was killed on the bridge of his flagship. His courageous initiative, inspiring leadership, and judicious foresight in a crisis of grave responsibility were in keeping with the finest traditions of the U.S. Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life in the defense of his country.


World War II History Medal of Honor Separator


Congressional Medal of Honor

BRUCE McCANDLESS

Rank and organization: Commander, U.S. Navy, U.S.S. San Francisco.
Place and date: Battle off Savo Island, 12-13 November 1942.
Entered service at: Colorado.
Born: 12 August 1911, Washington, D.C.
Other Navy award: Silver Star.

For conspicuous gallantry and exceptionally distinguished service above and beyond the call of duty as communication officer of the U.S.S. San Francisco in combat with enemy Japanese forces in the battle off Savo Island, 12-13 November 1942.

In the midst of a violent night engagement, the fire of a determined and desperate enemy seriously wounded Lt. Comdr. McCandless and rendered him unconscious, killed or wounded the admiral in command, his staff, the captain of the ship, the navigator, and all other personnel on the navigating and signal bridges. Faced with the lack of superior command upon his recovery, and displaying superb initiative, he promptly assumed command of the ship and ordered her course and gunfire against an overwhelmingly powerful force. With his superiors in other vessels unaware of the loss of their admiral, and challenged by his great responsibility, Lt. Comdr. McCandless boldly continued to engage the enemy and to lead our column of following vessels to a great victory. Largely through his brilliant seamanship and great courage, the San Francisco was brought back to port, saved to fight again in the service of her country.


World War II History Medal of Honor Separator


Congressional Medal of Honor

HERBERT EMERY SCHONLAND

Rank and organization: Commander, U.S. Navy, U.S.S. San Francisco.
Place and date: Savo Island, 12-13 November 1942.
Entered service at: Maine.
Born: 7 September 1900, Portland, Maine.

For extreme heroism and courage above and beyond the call of duty as damage control officer of the U.S.S. San Francisco in action against greatly superior enemy forces in the battle off Savo Island, 12-13 November 1942.

In the same violent night engagement in which all of his superior officers were killed or wounded, Lt. Comdr. Schonland was fighting valiantly to free the San Francisco of large quantities of water flooding the second deck compartments through numerous shell holes caused by enemy fire.

Upon being informed that he was commanding officer, he ascertained that the conning of the ship was being efficiently handled, then directed the officer who had taken over that task to continue while he himself resumed the vitally important work of maintaining the stability of the ship. In water waist deep, he carried on his efforts in darkness illuminated only by hand lanterns until water in flooded compartments had been drained or pumped off and watertight integrity had again been restored to the San Francisco.

His great personal valor and gallant devotion to duty at great peril to his own life were instrumental in bringing his ship back to port under her own power, saved to fight again in the service of her country.


[To create this Medal of Honor information directory we used primary source materials from the U.S. Army Center for Military History. However, the official citations have been edited to make them more readable.]

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