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Congressional Medal of Honor
Heroes of New Guinea


World War II History Medal of Honor Separator


Congressional Medal of Honor
Awarded Posthumously

GEORGE W. G. BOYCE, JR.

Rank and organization: Second Lieutenant, U.S. Army, 112th Cavalry Regimental Combat Team.
Place and date: Near Afua, New Guinea, 23 July 1944.
Entered service at: Town of Cornwall, Orange County, New York.
Born: New York City, New York.
G.O. No.: 25, 7 April 1945.

2d Lt. Boyce's troop, having been ordered to the relief of another unit surrounded by superior enemy forces, moved out, and upon gaining contact with the enemy, the two leading platoons deployed and built up a firing line. 2d Lt. Boyce was ordered to attack with his platoon and make the main effort on the right of the troop. He launched his attack but after a short advance encountered such intense rifle, machinegun, and mortar fire that the forward movement of his platoon was temporarily halted. A shallow depression offered a route of advance and he worked his squad up this avenue of approach in order to close with the enemy. He was promptly met by a volley of hand grenades, one falling between himself and the men immediately following.

Realizing at once that the explosion would kill or wound several of his men, he promptly threw himself upon the grenade and smothered the blast with his own body. By thus deliberately sacrificing his life to save those of his men, this officer exemplified the highest traditions of the U.S. Armed Forces.


World War II History Medal of Honor Separator


Congressional Medal of Honor
Awarded Posthumously

DALE ELDON CHRISTENSEN

Rank and organization: Second Lieutenant, U.S. Army, Troop E, 112th Cavalry Regiment.
Place and date: Driniumor River, New Guinea, 16-19 July 1944.
Entered service at: Gray, Iowa.
Born: Cameron Township, Iowa.
G.O. No.: 36, 10 May 1945.

2d Lt. Christensen repeatedly distinguished himself by conspicuous gallantry above and beyond the call of duty in the continuous heavy fighting which occurred in this area from 16-19 July.

On 16 July, his platoon engaged in a savage fire fight in which much damage was caused by one enemy machinegun effectively placed. 2d Lt. Christensen ordered his men to remain under cover, crept forward under fire, and at a range of 15 yards put the gun out of action with hand grenades.

Again, on 19 July, while attacking an enemy position strong in mortars and machineguns, his platoon was pinned to the ground by intense fire. Ordering his men to remain under cover, he crept forward alone to locate definitely the enemy automatic weapons and the best direction from which to attack. Although his rifle was struck by enemy fire and knocked from his hands he continued his reconnaissance, located five enemy machineguns, destroyed one with hand grenades, and rejoined his platoon. He then led his men to the point selected for launching the attack and, calling encouragement, led the charge. This assault was successful and the enemy was driven from the positions with a loss of four mortars and 10 machineguns and leaving many dead on the field.

On 4 August 1944, near Afua, Dutch New Guinea, 2d Lt. Christensen was killed in action about two yards from his objective while leading his platoon in an attack on an enemy machinegun position. 2d Lt. Christensen's leadership, intrepidity, and repeatedly demonstrated gallantry in action at the risk of his life, above and beyond the call of duty, exemplify the highest traditions of the U.S. Armed Forces.


World War II History Medal of Honor Separator


Congressional Medal of Honor
Awarded Posthumously

GERALD L. ENDL

Rank and organization: Staff Sergeant, U S. Army, 32d Infantry Division.
Place and date: Near Anamo, New Guinea, 11 July 1944.
Entered service at: Janesville, Wisconsin.
Born: Ft. Atkinson, Wisconsin.
G.O. No.: 17, 13 March 1945.

S/Sgt. Endl was at the head of the leading platoon of his company advancing along a jungle trail when enemy troops were encountered and a fire fight developed. The enemy attacked in force under heavy rifle, machinegun, and grenade fire. His platoon leader wounded, S/Sgt. Endl immediately assumed command and deployed his platoon on a firing line at the fork in the trail toward which the enemy attack was directed. The dense jungle terrain greatly restricted vision and movement, and he endeavored to penetrate down the trail toward an open clearing of Kunai grass. As he advanced, he detected the enemy, supported by at least 6 light and two heavy machineguns, attempting an enveloping movement around both flanks. His commanding officer sent a second platoon to move up on the left flank of the position, but the enemy closed in rapidly, placing our force in imminent danger of being isolated and annihilated. Twelve members of his platoon were wounded, 7 being cut off by the enemy. Realizing that if his platoon were forced farther back, these 7 men would be hopelessly trapped and at the mercy of a vicious enemy, he resolved to advance at all cost, knowing it meant almost certain death, in an effort to rescue his comrades. In the face of extremely heavy fire he went forward alone and for a period of approximately 10 minutes engaged the enemy in a heroic close-range fight, holding them off while his men crawled forward under cover to evacuate the wounded and to withdraw. Courageously refusing to abandon four more wounded men who were lying along the trail, one by one he brought them back to safety. As he was carrying the last man in his arms he was struck by a heavy burst of automatic fire and was killed. By his persistent and daring self-sacrifice and on behalf of his comrades, S/Sgt. Endl made possible the successful evacuation of all but one man, and enabled the two platoons to withdraw with their wounded and to reorganize with the rest of the company.


World War II History Medal of Honor Separator


Congressional Medal of Honor
Awarded Posthumously

RAY E. EUBANKS

Rank and organization: Sergeant, U.S. Army, Company D, 503d Parachute Infantry.
Place and date: At Noemfoor Island, Dutch New Guinea, 23 July 1944.
Entered service at: LaGrange, North Carolina.
Born: 6 February 1922, Snow Hill, North Carolina.
G.O. No.: 20, 29 March 1945.

While moving to the relief of a platoon isolated by the enemy, his company encountered a strong enemy position supported by machinegun, rifle, and mortar fire. Sgt. Eubanks was ordered to make an attack with one squad to neutralize the enemy by fire in order to assist the advance of his company. He maneuvered his squad to within 30 yards of the enemy where heavy fire checked his advance.

Directing his men to maintain their fire, he and two scouts worked their way forward up a shallow depression to within 25 yards of the enemy. Directing the scouts to remain in place, Sgt. Eubanks armed himself with an automatic rifle and worked himself forward over terrain swept by intense fire to within 15 yards of the enemy position when he opened fire with telling effect. The enemy, having located his position, concentrated their fire with the result that he was wounded and a bullet rendered his rifle useless.

In spite of his painful wounds he immediately charged the enemy and using his weapon as a club killed four of the enemy before he was himself again hit and killed.

Sgt. Eubanks' heroic action, courage, and example in leadership so inspired his men that their advance was successful. They killed 45 of the enemy and drove the remainder from the position, thus effecting the relief of our beleaguered troops.


World War II History Medal of Honor Separator


Congressional Medal of Honor
Awarded Posthumously

JOHNNIE DAVID HUTCHINS

Rank and organization: Seaman First Class, U.S. Naval Reserve.
Place and date: On board USS LST (Landing Ship, Tank) 473 during the assault on Lae, New Guinea, 4 September 1943.
Born: 4 August 1922, Weimer, Texas.
Accredited to: Texas.

As the ship on which Hutchins was stationed approached the enemy-occupied beach under a veritable hail of fire from Japanese shore batteries and aerial bombardment, a hostile torpedo pierced the surf and bore down upon the vessel with deadly accuracy. In the tense split seconds before the helmsman could steer clear of the threatening missile, a bomb struck the pilot house, dislodged him from his station, and left the stricken ship helplessly exposed. Fully aware of the dire peril of the situation, Hutchins, although mortally wounded by the shattering explosion, quickly grasped the wheel and exhausted the last of his strength in maneuvering the vessel clear of the advancing torpedo. Still clinging to the helm, he eventually succumbed to his injuries, his final thoughts concerned only with the safety of his ship, his final efforts expended toward the security of his mission. He gallantly gave his life in the service of his country.


World War II History Medal of Honor Separator


Congressional Medal of Honor

NEEL E. KEARBY

Rank and organization: Colonel, U.S. Army Air Corps.
Place and date: Near Wewak, New Guinea, 11 October 1943.
Entered service at: Dallas, Texas.
Born: Wichita Falls, Texas.
G.O. No.: 3, 6 January 1944.

Col. Kearby volunteered to lead a flight of four fighters to reconnoiter the strongly defended enemy base at Wewak. Having observed enemy installations and reinforcements at four airfields, and secured important tactical information, he saw an enemy fighter below him, made a diving attack and shot it down in flames.

The small formation then sighted approximately 12 enemy bombers accompanied by 36 fighters. Although his mission had been completed, his fuel was running low, and the numerical odds were 12 to one, he gave the signal to attack. Diving into the midst of the enemy airplanes he shot down three in quick succession. Observing one of his comrades with two enemy fighters in pursuit, he destroyed both enemy aircraft. The enemy broke off in large numbers to make a multiple attack on his airplane but despite his peril he made one more pass before seeking cloud protection.

Coming into the clear, he called his flight together and led them to a friendly base. Col. Kearby brought down six enemy aircraft in this action, undertaken with superb daring after his mission was completed.


World War II History Medal of Honor Separator


Congressional Medal of Honor
Awarded Posthumously

DONALD R. LOBAUGH

Rank and organization: Private, U.S. Army, 127th Infantry, 32d Infantry Division.
Place and date: Near Afua, New Guinea, 22 July 1944.
Entered service at: Freeport, Pennsylvania.
Born: Freeport, Pennsylvania
G.O. No.: 31, 17 April 1945.

For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty near Afua, New Guinea, on 22 July 1944. While Pvt. Lobaugh's company was withdrawing from its position on 21 July, the enemy attacked and cut off approximately one platoon of our troops. The platoon immediately occupied, organized, and defended a position, which it held throughout the night. Early on 22 July, an attempt was made to effect its withdrawal, but during the preparation therefor, the enemy emplaced a machinegun, protected by the fire of rifles and automatic weapons, which blocked the only route over which the platoon could move. Knowing that it was the key to the enemy position, Pfc. Lobaugh volunteered to attempt to destroy this weapon, even though in order to reach it he would be forced to work his way about 30 yards over ground devoid of cover. When part way across this open space he threw a hand grenade, but exposed himself in the act and was wounded. Heedless of his wound, he boldly rushed the emplacement, firing as he advanced. The enemy concentrated their fire on him, and he was struck repeatedly, but he continued his attack and killed two more before he was himself slain. Pfc. Lobaugh's heroic actions inspired his comrades to press the attack, and to drive the enemy from the position with heavy losses. His fighting determination and intrepidity in battle exemplify the highest traditions of the U.S. Armed Forces.


World War II History Medal of Honor Separator


Congressional Medal of Honor
Awarded Posthumously

JUNIOR VAN NOY

Rank and organization: Private, U.S. Army, Headquarters Company, Shore Battalion, Engineer Boat and Shore Regiment.
Place and date: Near Finschafen, New Guinea, 17 October 1943.
Entered service at: Preston, Idaho.
Born: Grace, Idaho.
G.O. No.: 17, 26 February 1944.

For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity above and beyond the call of duty in action with the enemy near Finschafen, New Guinea, on 17 October 1943. When wounded late in September, Pvt. Van Noy declined evacuation and continued on duty. On 17 October 1943 he was gunner in charge of a machinegun post only 5 yards from the water's edge when the alarm was given that three enemy barges loaded with troops were approaching the beach in the early morning darkness. One landing barge was sunk by Allied fire, but the other 2 beached 10 yards from Pvt. Van Noy's emplacement. Despite his exposed position, he poured a withering hail of fire into the debarking enemy troops. His loader was wounded by a grenade and evacuated. Pvt. Van Noy, also grievously wounded, remained at his post, ignoring calls of nearby soldiers urging him to withdraw, and continued to fire with deadly accuracy. He expended every round and was found, covered with wounds dead beside his gun. In this action Pvt. Van Noy killed at least half of the 39 enemy taking part in the landing. His heroic tenacity at the price of his life not only saved the lives of many of his comrades, but enabled them to annihilate the attacking detachment.


[To create this Medal of Honor information directory we used primary source materials from the U.S. Army Center for Military History. However, the official citations have been edited to make them more readable.]

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